Helping You to Find the Best Assisted Living Homes in Salisbury, NC

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There is no cost to families for Cathryn Petit’s placement services. Cathryn spends much of her time touring and reviewing local living communities – including assisted living, independent living, dementia and memory care, and residential care homes in Salisbury, NC and Winstom-Salem area. Cathryn then meets one-on-one with families to assess their needs. She accompanies them on tours of pre-approved facilities, assists them with their negotiations and paperwork, and follows up once your loved ones has moved in.

Who's Senior Care Authority?

Senior Care Authority has the expertise to help you identify and access all available options in assisted living and memory care in Salisbury, NC. We offer no-cost services to help you find appropriate senior living when your loved one can no longer care for themselves at home. Our personalized, face-to-face assistance can help relieve some of the stress and overwhelm during this difficult transition - our expertise and compassion will help lighten the load for you and your family.

Serving Salisbury, NC

Facts about Salisbury, NC

Salisbury is a city in North Carolina and the county seat of Rowan County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 33,663 in the 2010 Census (growing 27.8% from the previous Census in 2000). Salisbury is the home to famed North Carolina soft drink, Cheerwine, regional supermarket Food Lion, and the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association. It is one of only two cities in North Carolina to have gigabit capacity through its municipally-owned broadband system Fibrant. A press conference held September 3, 2015 at Catawba College announced Salisbury's Fibrant system is now capable of 10 gigabit capacity town-wide; believed to be the only town owned system in the world with this capacity.

History

In 1753 an appointed trustee for Rowan County was directed to enter 40 acres of land for a County Seat, and public buildings were erected. The deed is dated February 11, 1755 when Earl Granville conveyed 635 acres for the "Salisbury Township" The city was built at the intersection of a Native American trading route became an economic hub along the Great Wagon Road in North Carolina. It became the principle city of the Salisbury judicial and militia districts in the years leading up to the American War of Independence.

In the late 19th century the City became a railroad hub as people traveled along the eastern corridor. In the 20th century, Salisbury's economy grew into an industrial based economy, in a large part because of textiles and the numerous mills operating in the city.

Demographics

As of the census of 2010, there were 33,663 people, 10,276 households, and 6,186 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,488.3 people per square mile (574.6/km²). There were 11,288 housing units at an average density of 634.9 per square mile (245.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 57.30% White, 37.56% African American, 0.28% Native American, 1.39% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.92% from other races, and 1.48% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.30% of the population. As of 2011, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Salisbury reached a diversity milestone: the new racial makeup of the city is now only 48.6% non-Hispanic white, with other ethnicities comprising the majority 51.4% of Salisbury's population.

There were 10,276 households out of which 26.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.0% were married couples living together, 17.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% were non-families. 34.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.92.

AVERAGE RATING:

out of 20 reviews

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AVERAGE RATING:

out of 20 reviews